All About Bordetella

Also known as Kennel Cough

 

Bordetella (Kennel Cough)

Boarding your dog while you head out on vacation? Bordetella vaccine protection is available at Risen Star kennel for customers boarding with us. Your pet may not be going on spring vacation with you, but make sure he doesn't bring home any unwanted souvenirs — such as kennel cough — from the animal boarding facility. Veterinarians and animal boarding facilities around Chicago are reporting a spike in cases of kennel cough this year. The highly contagious animal respiratory illness causes persistent coughing, which can often sound like gagging or choking. While kennel cough isn't typically life threatening, the illness can cause infected dogs or cats to suffer prolonged fits of coughing and, left untreated by antibiotics, can worsen over time and even develop into pneumonia. So how can pet owners protect their dogs from the illness? “It’s a super timely question,” says veterinarian Dr. Tony Kremer of Kremer Veterinary Services, which operates several Chicago-area veterinary clinics. Vets at Kremer's clinics in Plainfield, Channahon, Oswego and Hinsdale, Illinois, have all reported seeing cases of kennel cough in recent weeks. Bordetella vaccine protects pets Making sure pets are up-to-date on their vaccinations is key to preventing the spread of kennel cough, which is highly contagious and easily transmitted from one pet to another. But in recent years, Kremer says some pet owners have become reluctant to vaccinate their pets. "Just like in children, people are afraid to vaccinate,” he says. But with a bigger portion of the pet population unvaccinated, “it’s way easier for it to spread like wildfire.” The name of the kennel cough vaccine — bordetella — has also causes confusion for some pet owners. “They think it’s to do with being boarded, and it isn’t,” Kremer says. All pets, regardless of whether they are boarded regularly, should get the bordetella vaccine, Kremer recommends. Because vaccinations don’t immediately protect a pet, he recommends vaccinating a pet at least two weeks before visiting a dog park, animal groomer, doggy day care or animal boarding kennel. Kremer also recommends pets receive a booster every six months. “This is an upper respiratory infection that dogs can get from a dog park,” he says. “They can get it at training. They can get it walking in the front door at a veterinary clinic. They can get it from another dog on the street or from objects that another dog has sneezed on or touched." RELATED: Which Vaccinations Does My Dog Need? “This is an upper respiratory infection that dogs can get from a dog park. They can get it at training. They can get it walking in the front door at a veterinary clinic. They can get it from another dog on the street or from objects that another dog has sneezed on or touched." Click to tweet Vet your kennel before drop off Boarding kennels and pet resorts should also do their part to stop the illness from spreading. When scheduling pet boarding and before leaving your pet, ask about a boarding facility’s policies on vaccinations — both to make sure your own pet is ready and that other dogs or cats won't expose yours to potential illness. Meghan McKinley, national team training manager and resort pet health and wellness expert at Paradise 4 Paws, says because kennel cough is spread like the common cold, it’s important for pet boarding facilities to have guidelines in place, including requiring bordetella vaccinations. Animal boarding facilities should also have strict cleaning protocols in place to minimize the potential for the illness to spread, she says. If you suspect your dog may have contracted kennel cough, in addition to contacting your vet for treatment, you should alert the pet resort or doggy daycare, McKinley says. That will allow boarders to investigate the potential for the illness to spread to other pets and to closely monitor any canine friends your pet may have played with, she says. Once a dog or cat recovers, pets should be kept away from boarding facilities for two weeks after the last day they show symptoms, or until their vet gives the all clear, she says. Boarding your dog while you head out on vacation? Don't forget to pack Bordetella vaccine protection for your pet before dropping him off at the animal kennel. Your pet may not be going on spring vacation with you, but make sure he doesn't bring home any unwanted souvenirs — such as kennel cough — from the animal boarding facility. Veterinarians and animal boarding facilities around Chicago are reporting a spike in cases of kennel cough this year. The highly contagious animal respiratory illness causes persistent coughing, which can often sound like gagging or choking. While kennel cough isn't typically life threatening, the illness can cause infected dogs or cats to suffer prolonged fits of coughing and, left untreated by antibiotics, can worsen over time and even develop into pneumonia. So how can pet owners protect their dogs from the illness? “It’s a super timely question,” says veterinarian Dr. Tony Kremer of Kremer Veterinary Services, which operates several Chicago-area veterinary clinics. Vets at Kremer's clinics in Plainfield, Channahon, Oswego and Hinsdale, Illinois, have all reported seeing cases of kennel cough in recent weeks. Bordetella vaccine protects pets Making sure pets are up-to-date on their vaccinations is key to preventing the spread of kennel cough, which is highly contagious and easily transmitted from one pet to another. But in recent years, Kremer says some pet owners have become reluctant to vaccinate their pets. "Just like in children, people are afraid to vaccinate,” he says. But with a bigger portion of the pet population unvaccinated, “it’s way easier for it to spread like wildfire.” The name of the kennel cough vaccine — bordetella — has also causes confusion for some pet owners. “They think it’s to do with being boarded, and it isn’t,” Kremer says. All pets, regardless of whether they are boarded regularly, should get the bordetella vaccine, Kremer recommends. Because vaccinations don’t immediately protect a pet, he recommends vaccinating a pet at least two weeks before visiting a dog park, animal groomer, doggy day care or animal boarding kennel. Kremer also recommends pets receive a booster every six months. “This is an upper respiratory infection that dogs can get from a dog park,” he says. “They can get it at training. They can get it walking in the front door at a veterinary clinic. They can get it from another dog on the street or from objects that another dog has sneezed on or touched." RELATED: Which Vaccinations Does My Dog Need? “This is an upper respiratory infection that dogs can get from a dog park. They can get it at training. They can get it walking in the front door at a veterinary clinic. They can get it from another dog on the street or from objects that another dog has sneezed on or touched." Click to tweet Vet your kennel before drop off Boarding kennels and pet resorts should also do their part to stop the illness from spreading. When scheduling pet boarding and before leaving your pet, ask about a boarding facility’s policies on vaccinations — both to make sure your own pet is ready and that other dogs or cats won't expose yours to potential illness. Meghan McKinley, national team training manager and resort pet health and wellness expert at Paradise 4 Paws, says because kennel cough is spread like the common cold, it’s important for pet boarding facilities to have guidelines in place, including requiring bordetella vaccinations. Animal boarding facilities should also have strict cleaning protocols in place to minimize the potential for the illness to spread, she says. If you suspect your dog may have contracted kennel cough, in addition to contacting your vet for treatment, you should alert the pet resort or doggy daycare, McKinley says. That will allow boarders to investigate the potential for the illness to spread to other pets and to closely monitor any canine friends your pet may have played with, she says. Once a dog or cat recovers, pets should be kept away from boarding facilities for two weeks after the last day they show symptoms, or until their vet gives the all clear, she says.